Oops! This is sure late to the party…

Somehow this post got eaten, and I didn’t notice. Bad blogger!

Outfitters

Anyhow, the punchline is: everyone who responded to the Fancy Jammies Giveaway won! Lillestoff were incredibly kind and sent over all the fabric, which I have sent on and everyone should have received by now. So, there’s that.

Stay tuned this week for the Fancy Jammies Sewalong! I know not everyone’s making Burda 7230, but I’ve been sewing with jerseys for a long time, and I’m including every tip and trick I can think of.

BurdaStyle 7230

Fancy Jammies Giveaway–Last Day to Comment!

 

Comment on this post to enter the giveaway–ONE day left to enter!

(Updated Every Day Until Giveaway Ends!)

Lillestoff, a manufacturer of lovely organic cotton jersey fabric, has offered give away 10 cuts of fabric OF YOUR CHOICE to commenters on the Sew Tiger Sew blog.

 

Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to the US e-commerce site for Lillestoff
  2. Find your very favorite jersey or woven fabric
  3. Comment below and let us know which pattern you’d use and which fabric you’d like to sew it up. Don’t forget to tell us how many meters you’d need for your size!

On October 11th I’ll choose 10 lucky winners at random. When I get the package from Lillestoff I’ll repackage and send your fabric on to you.

Lillestoff for US Customers

And then we can sew up our jammies together, whether you’ve won fabric in the giveaway or not. I’ll be sewing up this yardage in this BurdaStyle pattern for myself, and sharing all my jersey-sewing tips and tricks along the way.

BurdaStyle 7230

Join in! We’d love to shower you with comfy beauty. Remember, there will be TEN lucky winners!

Fancy Jammies Giveaway!

Hello there everyone!

How are you doing? Here in the SF Bay area this time of year is always a little confusing to me—kids have gone back to school and the pumpkin spice everything is on people’s minds, but it’s also when we have our real summer weather. Where I live, thankfully, it’s not too cold/foggy all summer, but I commute every day into San Francisco and usually bring a sweater to don once I get off the train there. This past week it’s been downright HOT in the city, as is pretty typical of September/October ‘round here.

Despite the heat, however, the light is definitely changing and I am thinking about Fall. Soon I’ll sew by lamplight in the evenings and I’ll swap my Birkenstock house shoes for wool slippers. And when the temperatures start to dip, it will be time for cozy lounge wear at home.

Is anyone else out there like me, dressed in me-made splendor all day long, only to don ratty yoga pants and pajamas from Target when it’s time to curl up with knitting or a book? Or maybe you already have a set or two of Closet Case Files Carolyn Pyjamas and you know how great it is to cuddle up in your handmades? Either way, doesn’t a little cozy luxury sound good for this Fall?

Here’s an example: I’ve made up these lounging pants for my husband, which he’s wearing whenever it’s cool enough. He chose the print and I adapted the pattern to suit how he likes to wear them, and he couldn’t be happier to come home and don his fancy jammies at the end of the day. Don’t you want some too?

Sleepy Foxes PJs!
Sleepy Foxes PJs!

Sleepy Foxes - 4

Well, Sew Tiger Sew and Lillestoff have your back!

I LOVE Lillestoff fabric. First introduced to them by Handmade by HeatherB and and Kadiddlehopper, I made my first Lillestoff garment last year. I started corresponding with the wonderful folks in Langenhagen, Germany, this Spring when I noticed that they had put up an e-commerce site. At the time, shipping costs to the US were very high, but they have since created an English version of the site and they themselves cover much of the shipping cost. They are delightful people and have set up a WONDERFUL looking showroom and sewing cafe at their manufacturing site, which I would dearly love to visit some day.

Screen Shot 2015-09-22 at 8.29.54 AM

Over these months Daniele and Nele and I have been plotting how best to help more of our wonderful sewing blogosphere here in the US get to know their wonderful fabrics. For Lillestoff not only offer the most amazing prints on jersey and woven fabrics, their fabric is organic and is a dream to sew. Stable and a little beefy, but with Lycra content and great recovery, their jerseys are also printed with a process that makes the prints resilient to stretching and not at all stiff or scratchy. I am in LOVE with Lillestoff fabric, and I want everyone to be able to try it!

I’m pleased to announce that we’ve come up with a great way to help a whole bunch of you try Lillestoff fabrics: a pyjama party of sorts!

Fancy Jammies is a giveaway and sewalong all rolled into one.

First, we’ll give away 10 lengths of luscious Lillestoff fabric, and then we can all sew up our fancy jammies together, and spend the Fall cozy and and fashionable in our whimsical or more elegant Lillestoff lounge-pants.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to the US e-commerce site for Lillestoff
  2. Find your very favorite jersey or woven fabric
  3. Find a fancy jammy pants pattern you want to sew (stash or new!)
  4. Comment below and let us know which pattern you’d use and which fabric you’d like to sew it up. Don’t forget to tell us how many meters you’d need for your size!
  5. On October 11th I’ll choose 10 lucky winners at random.
  6. When I get the package from Lillestoff I’ll repackage and send your fabric on to you.
Lillestoff for US Customers
Lillestoff for US Customers

And then we can sew up our jammies together, whether you’ve won fabric in the giveaway or not. I’ll be sewing up this yardage in this BurdaStyle pattern for myself, and sharing all my jersey-sewing tips and tricks along the way.

Don’t you want to get your cozy luxury on? Join in! We’d love to shower you with comfy beauty. Remember, there will be TEN lucky winners!

Fancy Jams

UFO Down!

Hi there!

It’s been a couple of weeks since I last posted, which is a pretty poor showing as I’m working to revive Sew Tiger Sew. While I’m not nuts about that, It’s just life. I have a very demanding job at a software startup, and sometimes it just takes over for a while. I even had so much work and work anxiety last weekend that I didn’t sew a stitch! I did do a bit of pattern adjustment for a Maria Denmark Rachel wrap dress, but that’s pretty small potatoes for me on a weekend. Sewing is a big part of how I restore on weekends and evenings.

I’ve also spent a silly amount of time looking for a way to create a nice looking graphic for a wonderful event we have coming up here on the blog, about which I am SO excited to tell you all very soon. I’m happy to say that I found a good online option for creating a blog badge without too much fuss—canva.com. Some of the backgrounds and images cost a small fee, but it’s a great way to slap something together and to know that you’re good with any copyright owners.

Anyhow! On to the sewing…I’ve had one UFO to pick off before I could really dive into this next project. Nope, I’m not taking potshots at the sky; I had to finish a pair of lightweight jeans I basted together as a muslin for the hiking trousers I made myself before our vacation in July! I’ve been literally short on trousers since my Ginger jeans went and shrank on me (turning themselves into ankle jeans!) even after I’d prewashed the fabric, so I wanted to finish these up.

High Pants - 3

High Pants - 1

It was a bit laborious for my taste, since I don’t know that I love this pattern for anything other than the hiking purposes, but I did the work in small doses, switching thread on my main machine rather than running the Singer featherweight as well for topstitching. This mainly worked out well, but I did have one hilarious snafu: I somehow topstitched one inner leg seam with the seam allowance toward the front of the leg, rather than the back. It’s not something I expect any mere mortal to notice, but it’s pretty funny if you know anything about jeans construction.

High Pants - 5

There are lots of ways in which I love these jeans, but some things are less than pleasing. The extra room I added to the back of the leg for the hiking trousers needs to be removed in a non-athletic application like this. And worst of all, there’s something a bit off in the crotch curve for this 10% stretch (the hiking trousers are about 30% stretch) so that while they are actually quite loose and breezy while I’m standing, they are a bit uncomfortable when I sit. Sad tiger! I’m hoping that, since I’m currently losing weight, it may resolve in a couple more weeks. On the other hand, looking at the rear view, I think my adjustments to the curve just really didn’t work out. I think I may convert these to a denim skirt and call it a day!

High Pants - 2

Finally! My First VNA Top

VNA - 1This is my first Fehrtrade VNA running top. After a bit of un-selfish sewing (these lounge pants for my brother-in-law, who envied his baby son’s purple pants when I made them), and the detail work of finishing off a UFO from before our trip to Switzerland, I needed a quick make last weekend and this one did the trick! It’s a fun, quick make and a great result!VNA - 2

I’d long had this fabric combination in mind, as the colors coordinate so well. The main fabric is an SPF wicking fabric from Seattle Fabrics, and the mesh is a yard I threw in my Fabric Mart basket a while ago, as I recall. I was thinking I might make some Seamster Rose Hip Tights out of it, but this combination caught my fancy when I placed the mesh into the “athletics” basket and they wound up next to each other!

Now I wish I’d thought to place the print more carefully on the back, but at the time I was just thinking in terms of economical fabric use. I still like it, and it’s already quite fancy for running gear! I recognize that it’s pretty silly to combine SPF fabric with completely translucent mesh, but I reckon it’s also not so logical to create a sleeveless top out of SPF either.VNA - 4

The construction was pretty straightforward, with a wonderful technique for creating a nice V at the front. I did find it a bit fiddly at the sides. I’m used to constructing my knitwear entirely on my serger, and I had to do the side seams on my regular machine with a fine zigzag due to the way the binding is applied. I may experiment with applying it differently on the armholes next time, to see if I can come up with an order of construction that doesn’t necessitate using both machines. Is this rational? Probably not, but I feel the drawn to try.VNA2 - 2

I especially want to see what I can do about the rear point, which I did not get smooth and nice. I will try sewing the long seam to connect the bottom section first, then hemming, to see if that helps. VNA - 2

What else to say? I made up a straight size L based on Melissa’s measurement chart, knowing that it was likely to be close-fitting in the bust and loose (as I like it) at the hips. While I do have some drag lines, I actually find the fit as it is very comfortable! I’m not used to being 1. a straight size or 2. potentially a larger size at the bust than the hip. Also a bit surprising to me, I really like the slightly higher hemline on this top. It feels comfortable and I think it flatters me as much as a running top over compression tights can.VNA2 - 1

The top was incredibly airy and light to run in, and I thoroughly enjoyed the first test run in 80-degree sunshine (it was, thank goodness, a low heart-rate run). The only issue I have found is that when I ran in it a second time, with my iPhone armband, I had some abrasion on my side where the armband is a bit scratchy and there’s no coverage from the top. Nothing I can blame the top for! I’ll try it with another armband I have, or maybe I’ll make a Fehrtrade armband from her free pattern!

I really love this top and I may make it with some adjustments for casual wear as well. One thing’s for sure, this is the first of many VNA tops I’ll be making!

Family Hiking Trousers

In the last blog post I showed you what I made for my husband and I to wear while we ran a half-marathon last November, 2014. Much more recently we took a vacation to Switzerland, where we went hiking in the Berner Oberland for 8 days. Neither of us had technical trousers for hiking, just running gear, so I set out to make us some!

A bit about fit

HikingPants - 10I chose to adapt this Sandra Betzina pattern I got at a fabric and pattern swap way back when at Mena Trott’s house. I adjusted it per my trouser block and then made a couple of muslins. I am almost done finishing up my wearable muslin in a 10% stretch lightweight denim from Robert Kaufman (if only my machine would make a perfect buttonhole on my garment, not the test fabric!). It’s going to be fun to have high-waisted, wide-legged jeans.HikingPants - 12

 

For my husband, I first created and tweaked a trouser block from Kershaw’s Patternmaking for Menswear. I actually want to go back and work on this some more before making him more trousers, but we ran a bit short on time, and he’s not too fond of the fitting process.

HikingPants - 11Once the block was acceptable, I used it to adjust the Jutland pattern from Thread Theory. I had to skip cargo pockets (I’ll definitely be making this with cargo pockets in the future!), but I did successfully include an articulated knee area more or less in the right zone for his knees. My attempt at articulated knees for my own trousers wound up around mid-thigh when I really bent my knees, but looked about right when standing up.

Though the fit isn’t perfect on these two pair, they were VERY comfortable and worked out super for our hiking adventures. I had a little trouble with this lightweight stretch wicking woven from Fabricline and topstitching thread, so I eventually gave up and did the last bits of topstitching with regular thread, as you can see here.

When the machine just won't topstitch with topstitching thread any more....
When the machine just won’t topstitch with topstitching thread any more….

HikingPants - 6Last, I had two immense brain cramps while making these: first, I couldn’t keep the right side of the fabric straight and created two pair of trousers with some pieces facing right-side-out and some right-side-in. Oh well! Second, and even more hilariously, I got the zipper guard confused when putting together the fly and sewed it to the wrong side of the zip! We did fine with this, but it took a little getting used to when zipping them up.

HikingPants - 8

HikingPants - 2
A bit roomier in the thighs for ease of movement. Good fit on the bum, if I do say so myself!

Here are some gratuitous pictures of our hiking trousers in action in Switzerland:

IMG_7554

IMG_7400

 

Catching Up: Athletic Edition

I’ve moved this blog to a self-hosted WordPress site now and am fixing to get into more regular blogging. I have had MAJOR blockages on taking Finished Object pictures because it involved coordinating with the Lion, but I’m going to try some other ways around that. To wit:

  1. Dressform pictures allowed
  2. iPhone pictures allowed
  3. Try Bluetooth iPhone trigger

But the main thing is that I do love seeing what others share and I really want to participate actively as well. So however funky the pictures may be, I’m going to just do it! And now, for a little catching up . . .

Going WAY back in time we have the jerseys I made for my Lion and myself for our half marathon last November. Not a long distance for some, it was plenty long for us at our slow speeds! We trained for much of 2014 for this race, and we wanted to have special jerseys to wear.

The Lion Prepping to Run
The Lion Prepping to Run

I worked out two patterns for us, a Burdastyle Men’s T-shirt pattern for my husband and the Jalie raglan sleeve top for myself. I made us each a wearable muslin of Robert Kaufman Laguna jersey. It’s super reliable fabric for stable t shirts and the like.

Spoonflower fabric with Lion and Tiger Motif
Spoonflower fabric with Lion and Tiger Motif

I ordered special printed fabric from Spoonflower. Since we have the fun convention of calling ourselves Lion and Tiger, this action-oriented print was a great choice. It was interesting to slice up my tracings of our jersey patterns so that the motif was featured well.

Lion Jersey
My jersey
My jersey

I found the base fabric at B&J in New York about a year ago, and while it breathes, it’s a bit warm. I think I’ll be sticking with Rose City Textiles, a.k.a. Fabricline.com, for wicking fabrics going forward. But anyhow, it is just fine for a cooler run. We had a fun, entertaining race despite some knee pain. And we sure looked fantastic while we were at it.

I'm ready to Go!
I’m ready to Go!